Weather Around The World, 7/21: Historic Rain In California; British Open Delayed; More Heat And Typhoons

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Home / Weather Around The World, 7/21: Historic Rain In California; British Open Delayed; More Heat And Typhoons
El Nino Eggplant is clearly evident in the central and eastern Pacific on this sea surface temperature anomaly chart for July 20. Analysis courtesy of NOAA.

El Nino Eggplant is clearly evident in the central and eastern Pacific on this sea surface temperature anomaly chart for July 20. Analysis courtesy of NOAA.

It’s summer; it’s hot; it’s rainy (even where it isn’t supposed to be).

Rain and wind stopped play at the British Open Golf Tournament at Saint Andrews, Scotland, and for only the second time in history the final round was played on Monday — in the rain.

Rain is not unusual in Scotland in July, but it is in San Diego, where a baseball game was postponed.

The hurricane that caused the rain in southern California has departed, but there’s a new one brewing to the south. And a typhoon, the second in a week, takes aim at Japan.

Meanwhile the rain in Spain that falls mainly in the plain has given way to searing heat. Let’s go Around The World.

Hurricane Dolores Causes Postponement Of Padres’ Game

It hadn’t happened for 820 games, but it happened Sunday. The San Diego Padres’ baseball game with the Colorado Rockies was postponed until September because of a downpour. In July. In San Diego. The Padres had been rained out once before at their Petco Park, but that was in early April of 2006. It simply doesn’t rain there in July — unless a hurricane has wandered up from the Mexican Tropics.

Hurricane Dolores began life in the fertile breeding ground south of Mexico, scraped the coast near Puerto Vallarta with tropical storm force winds, then largely petered out over the colder waters off Baja California. But the remnants stayed together enough to bring a rainy weekend to southern California. The Anaheim Angels’ game was also postponed Sunday, the first rainout there in 20 years.

El Niño Is At Least Partly To Blame

El Niño Eggplant is firmly established and is definitely the cause (at least partially) of the unusual summer rainfall. El Niños produce a low latitude jet stream which can push moisture from the tropics in the direction of the southwest US.

Eggplant is still building, and Decoded Science is confident enough in its influence on the weather of the southwestern United Sates to forecast well-above normal precipitation in California during the coming winter. .

Typhoon Nangka Strikes Japan

Formerly a category three storm, Typhoon Nangka struck southern Japan with bare-minimum typhoon winds. Flooding was the more significant issue, with reports of up to 30 inches of rain in some places. Two people were reported killed and 39 injured.

Typhoon Halola is heading for Japan. Forecast courtesy of US Navy.

Typhoon Halola is heading for Japan. Forecast courtesy of US Navy.

A second typhoon, Halola, is now headed for the same general region of Japan, but this storm is weaker, and should just be a moderate tropical storm when it makes landfall on Saturday. Again, rain and flooding will be the major concerns.

El Niño Eggplant is well-established in the Pacific and its correlations are holding: Increased tropical activity in the Pacific; Quiet conditions in the Atlantic. But hurricane and typhoon season has a long way to go — seven weeks to the historical peak of the Atlantic season.

Conditions are still favorable for tropical storm development off the southern and mid-Atlantic coast, where two systems have already formed.

Another Factor In Atlantic Hurricane Formation

Dry air from the Sahara Desert sometimes filters through the sub-tropical Atlantic Ocean. Since hurricanes thrive on moisture, the Saharan air subdues cyclone activity.

Recently a plume of ‘African dust,’ dry Saharan air filled with tiny particles of sand, has crossed the ocean, prompting elevations in air quality alerts in Florida. The National Hurricane Center has mentioned the dry air as an inhibiter of cyclone formation for at least the next week.

NOAA’s June Land And Sea Temperature And Precipitation Report

NOAA’s June global land and sea temperature report has been released and it’s a blockbuster: New high temperature records in almost every category, including the month of June, the firs six months of 2015, and the most recent full year. Climate-change deniers will be hard put to explain this one.

Decoded Science will have a full summary on Wednesday.

Checking In On The Indian Monsoon

Though El Niños sometimes reduce the monsoon rainfall in India, Eggplant doesn’t appear to be having any effect this year. The rain arrived on schedule and has been about normal, with a small deficit in the west and a slight surplus in the east.

Monsoon rains are important to India, providing moisture for crops and subduing the awful heat of May.

Seaweed On The Florida Coast

Sargassum weed is abundant in the Atlantic Ocean. Lately it has invaded the Florida coast. Photo credit: H. Scott Meister

Sargassum weed is abundant in the Atlantic Ocean. Lately it has invaded the Florida coast. Photo credit: H. Scott Meister

An inundation of Sargassum Weed has plagued south Florida beaches this summer, annoying swimmers and impeding the trek of hatchling sea turtles to the water.

The weed starts its life in the Sargasso Sea, midway between the US and Europe. Northerly winds bring it south and trade winds push it through the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico. Masses of weed frequently show up on the beaches of the western and northern Gulf.

Some weed gets carried clockwise around the Gulf of Mexico and into the Gulf Stream. East winds blow it ashore in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Daytona Beach.

Some experts believe that the chemicals used to combat the BP oil spill in the Gulf in 2010 have led to Sargassum blooms and enhanced the amount of weed that ends up on the east coast of Florida.

Spanish Heat Wave

The heat goes on in Spain. The high daily temperature has not failed to exceed the normal for the date since June 15. Temperatures in the 90s will continue for at least ten days, but there are signs of a cooling trend after that.

A strong jet stream over the continent has caused cool weather in northern Europe and hot weather to the south. The general flow is exacerbated by a persistent low pressure area between Greenland and England, apparently anchored by a cold pool of water.

The general trend of global warming has been warmer temperatures near the pole, inducing higher than normal pressures there and pushing the jet stream south. this pattern is evident this summer over both Europe and North America.

What’s Up With The Weather?

The new report on June global temperatures clearly indicates that the trend is towards ever more rapid climate change.

What changes do you see? Let Decoded Science know.

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