Nemo Found: Digging Out in the Aftermath of the Storm

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In Boston, cars were buried in snow. Photo: tvanhoosear / CC by 2.0

In Boston, cars were buried in snow. Photo: tvanhoosear / CC by 2.0

The snowstorm that the Weather Channel named ‘Nemo’ came and went early this weekend, but it left something behind: up to three feet of snow in some areas. Photos of cars buried in the drifts and homeowners opening their front doors to find snow packed up against them swirled around the internet, as towns and cities as far north as Toronto felt the blast of this winter snowstorm.

Did Nemo Cause Record-Breaking Snowfall?

In parts of the northeast, people had to shovel through drifts of snow that reached three feet. Boston received two feet of snow,  Milford, Connecticut topped that with a 38 inch recorded snowfall, and at 31.9 inches of snow, Portland, Maine’s snowfall broke local records.

While the JFK and Newark airports were closed due to concerns about the winter storm, they reopened on Saturday morning after New York City received a much smaller amount of snow than expected. Up to a foot of snow fell on the city, and by mid-day Saturday most traffic was moving normally in New York City.

The snowstorm didn’t quite live up to the infamous northeast blizzard of 1978. In that blizzard, on February 7, 1978, New Jersey and New York received record snowfall, and approximately 100 people died. In Boston, over 27 inches of snow fell, and Rhode Island received 27.6 inches. The 1978 storm caused 4500 injuries and hundreds of millions of dollars in damages.

Although the snowstorm was not quite as intense as some had anticipated, the states of New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Maine all declared a state of emergency this weekend, and hundreds of thousands of people are expected to remain without power until Monday.

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