More than 150,000 To Lose Water for Days: Would You Be Prepared?

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These water containers are great for storing water. Photo by Donmike 10

These water containers are great for storing water. Photo by Donmike 10

Carbonated beverages do not count as your drinking water requirements; carbonated beverages and alcohol can make you become dehydrated.

How To Store Water

This is just as important, as storing water in improper containers can lead to bacteria growth – and that’s the last thing you want in an emergency!

The CDC recommends that you purchase water that has been factory sealed as the best option; however, you can store water in food-grade-quality containers that you can purchase from sporting goods stores and other retailers.

Wash these containers, and sanitize them (use one teaspoon of chlorine bleach to one quart of water), and rinse them before storing water in them.

If you are storing tap water, you need to contact your public health department or water company and ask if the tap water needs to be treated before storing. Your local public health department can give you guidance on how to treat your local water for storing.

You should keep the water in a cool, dark place, such as a basement or cellar. If none of these are an option, a pantry would also work.

Water Safety in Prince George County

Residents in Prince George County are also finding that bottled water is hard to come by since it’s in high demand. Use this situation as an example to what could possibly happen in your community. There is a saying; “plan for the worst and hope for the best” so be prepared now and have enough water and supplies before disaster occurs.

Resources:

ABC News. More than 150,000 to lose water for days amid heat wave in Maryland. (2013). Accessed July 17, 2013.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Gather Emergency Supplies. (2011). Accessed July 18, 2013.

FEMA. Managing Water. Accessed July 18, 2013.

USA Today. Many unprepared for a disaster. May 10, 2007. Accessed July 17, 2013.

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