Hurricane Sandy Making People Sick? Sandy Aftermath: Illness

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Flooding and Bad Weather: Preventing Illnesses

Mold growing on walls after Hurricane Katrina. Photo by: Infrogmation.

To avoid the health effects of mold, the CDC recommends that people wear a N95 mask, eye goggles without ventilation, rubber gloves, long sleeve shirt, long pants, and work boots when cleaning up mold.

To prevent diarrheal diseases from contaminated water, wash hands frequently, do not eat or drink any food or beverage that has come in contact with flood waters, and do not allow children to play in flood waters or play with toys that have been in contact with flood waters.

If you or your family gets sick, wash hands often, cover coughs, and don’t share drinking or eating utensils to avoid spreading illness.

Hurricane Sandy: Enough Damage Already

Hurricane Sandy’s already caused enough problems – in the coming days and weeks we will see if it makes things worse by making people sick too.

Do what you can to avoid the long-term effects of flooding and bad weather – frequent hand washing, covering your cough, and staying out of homes and buildings that have been flooded without proper protective equipment are a few things you can do to stay safe in the aftermath of Sandy.

Resources:

United States Environmental Protection Agency. Flood Cleanup. (2012). Accessed November 4, 2012.

Operational Biosurveillance. Infectious Disease Event Forecasting. (2012). Accessed November 4, 2012.

New York Department of Health. Information about Mold. Accessed November 4, 2012.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Flu View. (2012). Accessed November 4, 2012.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mold Prevention Strategies and Possible Health Effects in the Aftermath of Hurricanes and Major Floods. (2006). Accessed November 4, 2012.

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